Politics Dissertation

Politics Dissertation-65
The module will be delivered through one weekly lecture over eleven weeks and one weekly seminar.This module is assessed as follows: This module will place the United Nations in the broader perspective of international organisation/institutions and will guide students towards an understanding of both the impact and the limitations of the United Nations in relation to the post-1945 international system.

The module will be delivered through one weekly lecture over eleven weeks and one weekly seminar.This module is assessed as follows: This module will place the United Nations in the broader perspective of international organisation/institutions and will guide students towards an understanding of both the impact and the limitations of the United Nations in relation to the post-1945 international system.It does so by first engaging in a systematic examination of some of the main issues, both thematic and methodological, involved in the study of comparative political systems today, and then by applying the insights gained to leading political systems.

It aims to encourage the development of a truly 'global' perspective on politics by demonstrating the range and extent of 'non-domestic' influences on national political and economic systems.

The assessed components on this module are: This module is designed to introduce students to the methodology and practice of comparative politics.

The second part of the module focuses on social divisions, on how we choose and influence our leaders and on how we maintain civil society (for example, law and order).

The final part covers public policy and includes economic and environmental issues.

The module will be delivered through weekly lectures and weekly seminars over 11 weeks giving a total of 33 hours.

This module is assessed as follows: Presentation: Should relate to one of the weekly themes - the title should be agreed with the module convenor Dr Abdullah Yusuf.

These are: The second section then explores the 'processes' of international relations - both co-operative and conflictual (diplomacy; international law; international organization; economic conflict; terrorism; war etc).

This module is designed to introduce students to the structures and processes which characterise relationships in the contemporary international system, and to place these structures and processes in their historical context.

The global political environment is then examined and its characteristics as a 'system' explored.

Attention then focuses on the competing perspectives - or 'paradigms' - of international relations, the general 'models' of interaction which set out to illustrate the 'driving forces' of international relations.

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