Persuasive Essay About The War In Iraq

Persuasive Essay About The War In Iraq-90
So at least part of the problem lies not in our stars, but in ourselves.Nation-building—as we know from late republican Rome to 19th-century Britain to postwar America—is rightly an epiphenomenon, not a catalyst.Codevilla begins by citing polls that may reflect American unhappiness with our on-again/off-again wars and even greater dissatisfaction with our government itself.

So at least part of the problem lies not in our stars, but in ourselves.Nation-building—as we know from late republican Rome to 19th-century Britain to postwar America—is rightly an epiphenomenon, not a catalyst.Codevilla begins by citing polls that may reflect American unhappiness with our on-again/off-again wars and even greater dissatisfaction with our government itself.

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The country no longer translates its oil wealth into attacks against its neighbors.

The recent election of the secularist Ayad Allawi suggests that Iraqis are more worried about religious fundamentalism than about candidates supposedly tainted with past American associations.

That delusion is fueled in part by the fallacy that nuclear weapons somehow have changed conflict irrevocably by limiting war.

Here, too, the dour Codevilla seems to have presaged President Obama's recent nuclear initiatives, which boil down to assuring would-be nuclear enemies that, On the diplomatic front, Codevilla describes accurately a "speak loudly and carry a small stick" policy, the signature of what he calls "the ruling class." Again, note Barack Obama's four missed deadlines for the Iranian theocracy to quit weapons-grade production of enriched uranium-capped by the regime's denunciation of Obama's summit on non-proliferation.

His pessimistic appraisal covers America's nearly decade-long, multifaceted counter-response to radical Islam: he argues that we did not achieve of our aims in Iraq; that our therapeutic diplomacy has weakened us in relation to our enemies in the Middle East; and that nine years after 9/11, we have not improved to any measurable degree our homeland security. At first glance, many would certainly think so—after all, Americans have not been hit by another major attack comparable to 9/11.

Although we immediately allowed the Baathist-led army to dissipate, watched wide-scale looting in Baghdad, pulled back from the first siege of Fallujah, and gave a reprieve to Moqtada Sadr, Iraq's consensual government survives against all odds.

The reason for our hesitancy is because we, the American people, would probably be uncomfortable with what that follow-through would entail.

From time to time, we get a glimpse of the public queasiness to which such unapologetic force leads: the monster Milosevic slowly morphing into a victim as the Clinton bombing became prolonged and occasionally sloppy; the American repugnance in late February 1991 at the televised "Highway of Death" when looters, thugs, and rapists were incinerated with their booty on the way home from rapine in Kuwait—and on their way to murder Shiite insurrectionists; or the collective furor at seeing American contractors hung on girders outside of Fallujah in spring 2004 quickly transmogrifing from a tough Marine response into outsourcing the problem to the Baathist "Fallujah Brigade."In other words, had we waged a tougher war in Iraq, or in ruthless fashion played off one tribal thug against another in Afghanistan, or really cut off commerce with Iran, the American people might not have welcomed the fallout—especially as amplified and dissected by National Public Radio, . You're never in doubt about what he thinks or why he thinks it.

In recent years, we put the proverbial cart of nation-building before the horse of crushing an enemy, because in our opulent, therapeutic society we thought we could get away with it (and in small wars like Panama and Grenada sometimes did), and because we did not wish to feel that we had forsaken the world of reason and caring, in order to operate on bleak principles deeply embedded within our reptilian brains.

Thus we do not give the Arab autocracies, the Islamic terrorists, or would-be nuclear Iran the sort of quiet ultimatums, backed by real action, that Codevilla would like: cease your anti-American aggression or face untold hurt and damage.

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