Freud Essay Medusa

Freud Essay Medusa-51
Antigone is central to post-Freudian psychoanalysis, particularly the conflict between Jacques Lacan and Luce Irigaray whose own rebellion against the patriarchal hegemony of psychoanalysis is a cornerstone of contemporary feminist theory.The section begins with Miriam Leonard ("Lacan, Irigaray, and Beyond: Antigones and the Politics of Psychoanalysis") who continues Pollock's musings on the possibilities that Antigone (rather than Oedipus) offers for psychoanalysis.

Antigone is central to post-Freudian psychoanalysis, particularly the conflict between Jacques Lacan and Luce Irigaray whose own rebellion against the patriarchal hegemony of psychoanalysis is a cornerstone of contemporary feminist theory.The section begins with Miriam Leonard ("Lacan, Irigaray, and Beyond: Antigones and the Politics of Psychoanalysis") who continues Pollock's musings on the possibilities that Antigone (rather than Oedipus) offers for psychoanalysis.

The purpose of the volume, which is part of an OUP series "Classical Presences," is to explore how classical myth has influenced the development of feminist thought, and correspondingly how Classical Studies can be interpreted within a feminist framework.

The collection is interdisciplinary in nature and will not only be of interest to students and scholars of Classical Studies, but also of Women's Studies and Cultural Studies.

The following essay by Vanda Zajko ("Who are We When We Read: Keats, Klein, Cixous, and Cook's Achilles") continues to explore the process of "identification" (including the formation of gender identity), with special consideration of how a reader identifies with characters in a fictional text.

At the center of her study is the figure of Achilles, with whom various scholars and writers including Cixous herself have identified.

This collection of fifteen essays plus one short piece of fiction combines both these intellectual enterprises in a unique and well-timed volume that presents feminist scholars from other disciplines alongside Classicists whose work has been informed by feminist theory.

The project takes its title from the "The Laugh of Medusa," the foundational 1975 essay by feminist poststructuralist Helene Cixous.

Table of Contents Two dynamic modes of inquiry are helping to make Classical Studies a livelier and more inclusive discipline in this new millennium.

Feminist theory proves to be a powerful tool of analysis for Greco-Roman culture, while the Classical Tradition, an umbrella term that includes both the reception of ancient culture and its influence on modern literature and thought, has effaced the boundaries that have fenced off traditional philology from the other humanities.

In "Antigone and the Politics of Sisterhood," Simon Goldhill reflects on the centrality of Antigone to influential feminist projects such as those of Irigaray and Butler, but wonders why feminism has all but written her sister, Ismene, out of the text.

Goldhill poses a challenge to recent analyses of Sophocles' tragedy by questioning why they privilege the relationship between brother and sister yet ignore Antigone's treatment of her sister.

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