Daydreaming Research Paper

Daydreaming Research Paper-6
For 7 days, 8 times a day, the researchers randomly asked 274 undergraduates at North Carolina at Greensboro whether they were mind-wandering and the quality of their daydreams.They also asked them to engage in a range of tasks in the laboratory that assessed their rates of mind-wandering, the contents of their off-task thoughts, and their "executive functioning" (a set of skills that helps keep things in memory despite distractions and focus on the relevant details).My concern is that a lot of my daydreams involve people treating me differently than they actually would in real life, and there’s not much I can do in real life to change [that]” So—like Freud’s imagined orphan—she has fantasies where everything goes great and every move she makes is awesome. I’m pretty lax about my fantasies compared to Foley.

For 7 days, 8 times a day, the researchers randomly asked 274 undergraduates at North Carolina at Greensboro whether they were mind-wandering and the quality of their daydreams.They also asked them to engage in a range of tasks in the laboratory that assessed their rates of mind-wandering, the contents of their off-task thoughts, and their "executive functioning" (a set of skills that helps keep things in memory despite distractions and focus on the relevant details).My concern is that a lot of my daydreams involve people treating me differently than they actually would in real life, and there’s not much I can do in real life to change [that]” So—like Freud’s imagined orphan—she has fantasies where everything goes great and every move she makes is awesome. I’m pretty lax about my fantasies compared to Foley.

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Daydreaming, he theorized, is important for creative thinking.

When we indulge in fantasies about our hopes for the future, we prepare ourselves to deal with reality.

Western culture tends to look down on daydreamers—as if it’s a childish habit that we’re supposed to outgrow, along with make-believe games and imaginary friends.

But none other than Sigmund Freud, the father of modern psychology, thought that most adults daydream too little.

That said, as long as your mind isn’t wandering over your problems again and agaian, fantasizing can be useful.

Take my Quartz colleague, health and science writer Katherine Ellen Foley.

Or maybe my mind’s just taking its time while it still can.

Either way, I’ve long been convinced having my head in the clouds has benefits—and I’m happy that there’s proof that daydreaming doesn’t make you a flake.

Maybe you’re just making wishes—the better to act on later.

’s free newsletters."data-newsletterpromo-image="https://static.scientificamerican.com/sciam/cache/file/458BF87F-514B-44EE-B87F5D531772CF83_source.png"data-newsletterpromo-button-text="Sign Up"data-newsletterpromo-button-link="https:// origincode=2018_sciam_Article Promo_Newsletter Sign Up"name="article Body" itemprop="article Body"has really got me revved up, and I am bursting to share their findings with you!

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