China Book Business Report

China Book Business Report-85
China is an example of what is often called a ‘mobile-first’ economy, meaning that many consumers primarily use their phones to access the internet.

This week The London Book Fair is taking a tour of the publishing industry around the world with its Virtual Conference Around The World in 8 Hours.

The conference begins in China with a Virtual keynote to delegates, setting out the market and opportunities for book publishers in the world’s fastest growing consumer economy – China.

We’re participating in the Virtual Conference with this post – the Top Five Trends that are transforming the book business in China.

To get involved with the conference on the day, keep an eye on the hashtag #pdmc15 or follow London Book Fair on Twitter.

In China, publishing a novel online in installments via Qidian bears some similarities to self-publishing (though in fact it’s closer to posting fiction on Wattpad than publishing via Kindle Direct Publishing) but it’s not strictly publishing.

In China, for a book to be sold in a bookshop it requires an ISBN, and ISBN numbers can only be issued by the government via a state-owned publisher.

Platforms like allow writers to get their work into readers’ hands without having to pursue state approval first.

It’s a form of self-publishing, but not quite as we know it.

We reported on the Chinese phenomenon of ‘freemium fiction’ back in 2011, and since then the trend has only grown in popularity, with some series racking up in excess of 200 million readers Freemium fiction sites such as work by allowing writers to register for free and write stories in installments of up to 6,000 characters.

Readers then pay between 0.02-0.07 Yuan (which is just a fraction of [[

In China, for a book to be sold in a bookshop it requires an ISBN, and ISBN numbers can only be issued by the government via a state-owned publisher.

Platforms like allow writers to get their work into readers’ hands without having to pursue state approval first.

It’s a form of self-publishing, but not quite as we know it.

We reported on the Chinese phenomenon of ‘freemium fiction’ back in 2011, and since then the trend has only grown in popularity, with some series racking up in excess of 200 million readers Freemium fiction sites such as work by allowing writers to register for free and write stories in installments of up to 6,000 characters.

Readers then pay between 0.02-0.07 Yuan (which is just a fraction of $0.01) to read each new installment.

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In China, for a book to be sold in a bookshop it requires an ISBN, and ISBN numbers can only be issued by the government via a state-owned publisher.Platforms like allow writers to get their work into readers’ hands without having to pursue state approval first.It’s a form of self-publishing, but not quite as we know it.We reported on the Chinese phenomenon of ‘freemium fiction’ back in 2011, and since then the trend has only grown in popularity, with some series racking up in excess of 200 million readers Freemium fiction sites such as work by allowing writers to register for free and write stories in installments of up to 6,000 characters.Readers then pay between 0.02-0.07 Yuan (which is just a fraction of $0.01) to read each new installment.He sold more more than 7 million print copies of his books in 2013, but the money he can also earn from online subscriptions and licensing fees for turning books into films, TV programmes and games pushed his earnings to 50 miliion Yuan ($7.98 million).One key difference between the Chinese reading market and the book market in the west is that millions readers in China are hooked on serialized fiction.After gaining enormous popularity online, the stories were collected into Zheng Yuanjie, whose fairy tales have earned him the moniker of the Chinese Hans Christian Anderson, earned 19 million Yuan ($3 million) last year, while Yang Hongying, the country’s, often called China’s JK Rowling for her ability to sell books in huge quantities at home and abroad took home 18.5 million Yuan ($2.95 million).Authors can earn even greater sums away from traditional publishing by writing and publishing their work on the internet.China has some of the highest engagement with online shopping in the world, and it’s growing fast.Recent research by Nielsen showed that 64% of Chinese shoppers bought physical books online and 51% intended to buy at least one ebook in the next year.

]].01) to read each new installment.

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